Have you ever heard of SK Day? SK is an amazing female mathematician named Sonia Kovalevsky. Kovalevsky was born in Moscow, Russia, in 1850 and was the first woman to earn a doctorate in mathematics. The UofA hosted middle and high school students virtually for SK Day this year to encourage young women to study mathematics.

I attended the Zoom meeting about mathematics on SK Day. Team members from the UofA delivered a shirt and supplies to our homes prior to the event!

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 Prior to the landing of the NASA Rover Perseverance on Mars, I attended a live NASA webinar, Mars Perseverance: Mission Overview & Countdown to Mars. A team of eight scientists led this webinar for students and teachers.

Justin Simon (a NASA scientist) talked about the planet Mars and about the rover Perseverance. He talked about the weather on Mars and what kind of planet it was. Simon also talked about the certain parts of the 2,260-pound rover and how they worked.

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 Have you ever been interested in fossils? How about finding things you’ve never seen before?

 David K. Elliott is a paleontologist. (He is also a professor in the Geology Program at Northern Arizona University.) He first discovered that he wanted to study bones when he was 14 or 15. “My family took long walks outdoors. I lived in the south east of England. At the age of 10, a teacher brought rocks and minerals to class and I thought it was interesting,” says Elliott.

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 Have you ever been on a Zoom with a gecko? I didn’t think so, but I have. Thanks to SciTech, I can learn all about STEM without having to leave my couch.

On “Things Tuesday,” I got to learn about Static Electricity and Heat Energy, how Plasma Globes and Radiometers work, and all about UV lights. How Plasma Globes Work was a great one, and now I’m working to convince my mom to buy me one. Also, on “Make it Monday,” I was inspired to get out my dominoes again, and I built a large domino chain reaction. Science Scattergories on “Fun Friday” was, as described, very fun.

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 On Jan. 21, Young Reporters had another virtual opportunity to interview a guest, Kelly Saunders. She is the program manager for the Rob and Melani Walton Sustainability Solutions Services through Arizona State University. Saunders plans and organizes the annual Sustainability Solutions Festival, events which promote sustainability for people, the environment, and communities.

The Sustainability Solutions Festival focuses its events and programs on four subjects: Food, Environment, Well-Being and Connect with Each Other.

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 The Lunar New Year is a Chinese Tradition. It is also known as the Chinese New Year. It is the new year of the Chinese Calendar.

The Lunar New Year begins on Feb. 12, 2021, and it is the year of Ox. The animals are according to the year of your birth. I am a Rabbit. The animals are Rat, Ox, Tiger, Rabbit, Dragon, Snake, Horse, Goat, Monkey, Rooster, Dog and Pig.

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At a recent virtual event, Young Reporters met ASU’s Kelly Saunders, the program manager from the Rob and Melani Walton Sustainability Solutions Service. Saunders talked about the Sustainability Solutions Festival, and how many innovators and faculty come together to solve sustainability problems.

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 I saw the Christmas star on Dec. 21! Did you see it? Did you know what it was? Bear Essential  gave Young Reporters the opportunity to interview Steve Kortenkamp, an astronomer at the University of Arizona.

He said that the conjunction happened because Saturn and Jupiter aligned by orbiting the sun and eventually lining up. The moon and the Earth do the same and that is called an eclipse. Some are solar eclipses while others are lunar eclipses. The next time that a nice solar eclipse will happen in Arizona will be in 2024.

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